Lift Maintenance

We want to ensure that you obtain the highest performance and safety from our products, so we have put together a lift maintenance schedule for your benefit. Please read the following preventative maintenance schedule carefully. Following these steps will help to ensure that you the get the longest and safest use out of your vehicle lift.

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE FOR VEHICLE LIFTS

WEEKLY
  1. Lubricate all rollers with general purpose oil or WD-40.
  2. Check all cable connections, bolts and pins to ensure proper mounting.
  3. Lubricate safety lock pivot points with general purpose oil or WD-40.
MONTHLY
  1. Check Safety Locks to insure they are in good operating condition.
  2. Check all Cables for excessive signs of wear.
  3. Make a visual inspection of ALL MOVING PARTS and check for excessive signs of wear.
  4. Replace ALL FAULTY PARTS before lift is put back into operation.
REQUIRED MONTHLY MAINTENANCE
  • Check all arm adjusting locks for proper operation.
  • Check all cables connections, bolts and pins to ensure proper mounting and torque.
  • Visually inspect safeties for proper operation.
  • Lubricate columns with grease.
  • Inspect all anchors bolts and retighten if necessary.
  • Check all columns for squareness and plumb.
  • Inspect all pivot arms pins making sure they are properly secure.
  • Check equalizer cable tension, and adjust if necessary.
  • If lift is equipped with over head cut-off switch, check for proper operation.

OTHER MAINTENANCE TO ENSURE PROPER PERFORMANCE

WIRE ROPE INSPECTION
  • Lifting cables should be replaced every three - five years or when visible signs of damage are apparent. DO NOT USE LIFT WITH DEFECTIVE / WORN CABLES.
  • Lifting cables should be maintained in a well-lubricated condition at all times. Wire rope is only fully protected when each wire strand is lubricated both internal and external. Excessive wear will shorten the life of the wire rope. The factory suggested wire rope lubricant that penetrates to the core of the rope and provides long-term lubrication between each individual strand is 90-WT gear oil or ALMASOL? Wire Rope Lubricant. In order to make sure that the inner layers of the rope remain well lubricated, lubrication should be carried out at intervals not exceeding three months during operation.
  • All sheaves and guide rollers in contact with the moving rope should be given regular visual checks for surface wear and lubricated to make sure that they run freely. This operation should be carried out at appropriate intervals generally not exceeding three months during operation. For all sheave axles, the factory recommends standard wheel bearing grease. For all sheaves and/or guide rollers, the factory recommends 90-WT gear oil or similar heavy lubricant applied by any method including pump / spray dispensing, brush, hand and/or swabbing.
HOW OFTEN TO INSPECT
  • Lifting cables should be visually inspected at least once each day when in use, as suggested by American Petroleum Institute (API) RP54 guidelines.
  • Any lifting cables that have met the criteria for removal must be immediately replaced.
WHEN TO REPLACE LIFTING CABLES DUE TO BROKEN WIRES
  • Lifting cables should be removed from service when you see six randomly distributed broken wires within any one lay length, or three broken wires in one strand within one lay length.
OTHER REASONS TO REPLACE LIFTING CABLES
  • Corrosion that pits the wires and/or connectors.
  • Evidence of kinking, crushing, cutting, bird-caging or a popped core.
  • Wear that exceeds 10% of a wire's original diameter.
  • Evidence of heat damage.
HOW TO FIND BROKEN WIRES
  • The first step is to relax your rope to a stationary position and move the pick-up points off the sheaves. Clean the surface of the rope with a cloth - a wire brush, if necessary - so you can see any breaks.
  • Flex the rope to expose any broken wires hidden in the valleys between the strands.
  • Visually check for any broken wires. One way to check for crown breaks is to run a cloth along the rope to check for possible snags.
  • With an awl, probe between wires and strands and lift any wires that appear loose. Evidence of internal broken wires may require a more extensive rope examination.